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DC to Provide Free Internet for 25,000 Low-Income Students, Families


a close up of a keyboard: XIAN, CHINA – OCTOBER 14: (CHINA OUT) A blind child touches a keyboard during a computer class at the Xian School for the Blind and Deaf-mute October 14, 2005 in Xian of Shaanxi Province, China. The Xian School for the Blind and Deaf-mute, established in 1949, is one of the earliest schools in China built to provide education for blind and deaf-mute children and their parents. The school currently has about 200 students, including over 50 blind students. According to state media, China has over 1.4 million handicapped children under six-years-old, and the figure is rising by approximately 200,000 a year. The International White Cane Safety Day, known as the festival for the blind falls on October 15. (Photo by China Photos/Getty Images)


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XIAN, CHINA – OCTOBER 14: (CHINA OUT) A blind child touches a keyboard during a computer class at the Xian School for the Blind and Deaf-mute October 14, 2005 in Xian of Shaanxi Province, China. The Xian School for the Blind and Deaf-mute, established in 1949, is one of the earliest schools in China built to provide education for blind and deaf-mute children and their parents. The school currently has about 200 students, including over 50 blind students. According to state media, China has over 1.4 million handicapped children under six-years-old, and the figure is rising by approximately 200,000 a year. The International White Cane Safety Day, known as the festival for the blind falls on October 15. (Photo by China Photos/Getty Images)

Up to 25,000 low-income students and families in D.C. are set to be provided free internet connections under a new initiative from Mayor Muriel … Read More

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Helping Connect Low-Income Students in Kirkland to the Internet

With distance learning plans rolling out across Washington state due to the coronavirus, Comcast today announced a new program for schools and nonprofits located in King County to connect low-income K-12 students to the Internet at home. The “Internet Essentials Partnership Program” is designed to help accelerate Internet adoption at a critical time.

In nearly ten years, Internet Essentials has become the nation’s largest and most successful low-income Internet adoption program and has connected millions of people to the Internet. To-date, more than 132,000 people throughout King County have benefited for the program. The program offers households low-cost, broadband Internet service for $9.95/month, the option to purchase a heavily subsidized computer, and multiple options for digital literacy training.

The Internet Essentials Partnership Program is supported through public-private collaboration and enables entire communities to work together to coordinate funding to help connect K-12 students at no cost to the customer. The

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Connecting Low-Income Students in King County to the Internet

With distance learning plans rolling out across Washington state due to the coronavirus, Comcast today announced a new program for schools and nonprofits located in King County to connect low-income K-12 students to the Internet at home. The “Internet Essentials Partnership Program” is designed to help accelerate Internet adoption at a critical time.

In nearly ten years, Internet Essentials has become the nation’s largest and most successful low-income Internet adoption program and has connected millions of people to the Internet. To-date, more than 132,000 people throughout King County have benefited for the program. The program offers households low-cost, broadband Internet service for $9.95/month, the option to purchase a heavily subsidized computer, and multiple options for digital literacy training.

The Internet Essentials Partnership Program is supported through public-private collaboration and enables entire communities to work together to coordinate funding to help connect K-12 students at no cost to the customer. The

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Connecting Low-Income South Sound Students to the Internet

With distance learning plans rolling out across Washington state due to the coronavirus, Comcast today announced a new program for schools and nonprofits located in Pierce and Thurston Counties to connect low-income K-12 students to the Internet at home. The “Internet Essentials Partnership Program” is designed to help accelerate Internet adoption at a critical time.

In nearly ten years, Internet Essentials has become the nation’s largest and most successful low-income Internet adoption program and has connected millions of people to the Internet. To-date, more than 62,000 people throughout Pierce and Thurston Counties have benefited for the program. The program offers households low-cost, broadband Internet service for $9.95/month, the option to purchase a heavily subsidized computer, and multiple options for digital literacy training.

The Internet Essentials Partnership Program is supported through public-private collaboration and enables entire communities to work together to coordinate funding to help connect K-12 students at no cost

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Universum’s most attractive US employers for computer science students

  • Employer-branding company Universum shared its latest annual rankings of the most attractive US employers for college students for 2020.
  • According to their findings, computer science students are hoping to work for tech giants and video game companies. 
  • Google remained as the most attractive employer for these students, holding the top slot from last year’s ranking. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Computer science students across the US are hoping to land a job at software and gaming companies ranging from Nintendo to Google.

Employer-branding company Universum just published this year’s ranking of the most attractive US employers. Universum surveyed over 43,700 students from a variety of fields and universities about what they want in a future employer. 

One of the questions asked respondents for the five ideal employers that they most wanted to work for. The employer-branding firm then ranked companies and organizations by finding which had the highest

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New foreign students can’t enter US if courses online

A week after revoking sweeping new restrictions on international students, federal immigration officials on Friday announced that new foreign students will be barred from entering the United States if they plan to take their classes entirely online this fall.

In a memo to college officials, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said new students who were not already enrolled as of March 9 will “likely not be able to obtain” visas if they intend to take courses entirely online. The announcement primarily affects new students hoping to enroll at universities that will provide classes entirely online as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

International students who are already in the U.S. or are returning from abroad and already have visas will still be allowed to take classes entirely online, according to the update, even if they begin instruction in-person but their schools move online in the face of a worsening outbreak.

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Watsonville Students Likely Won’t Return To School This Fall

WATSONVILLE, CA — The Santa Cruz County Office of Education confirmed Monday that it does not anticipate students will return to in-person classes in the fall.

That’s because Santa Cruz County met the criteria for the state monitoring list, which indicates state public health officials are keeping an eye on concerning COVID-19 statistics, wrote Pajaro Valley Unified School District Superintendent Michelle Rodriguez and other county schools officials in an open letter Monday. Of particular concern was the fact that the COVID-19 case count has been higher than 100 cases per 100,000 people for more than three consecutive days, school officials said.

While Santa Cruz County had not been added the state’s list as of Tuesday evening, county Health Officer Gail Newel previously said that she expected Santa Cruz County to join its neighboring counties on the monitoring list.

In order for a school district to open for in-class instruction, it

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Santa Cruz Students Likely Won’t Return To School This Fall

SANTA CRUZ, CA — The Santa Cruz County Office of Education confirmed Monday that it does not anticipate students will return to in-person classes in the fall.

That’s because Santa Cruz County met the criteria for the state monitoring list, which indicates state public health officials are keeping an eye on concerning COVID-19 statistics, wrote Santa Cruz City Schools Superintendent Kris Munro and other county schools officials in an open letter Monday. Of particular concern was the fact that the COVID-19 case count has been higher than 100 cases per 100,000 people for more than three consecutive days.

While Santa Cruz County had not been added the state’s list as of Tuesday evening, county Health Officer Gail Newel previously said that she expected Santa Cruz County to join its neighboring counties on the monitoring list.

In order for a school district to open for in-class instruction, it must be in

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Case of teen jailed for missing online classwork shows how schools and courts oppress Black students

While school districts all over the country grapple with how to best educate youth this upcoming academic year during a global pandemic, one Michigan teen sits in a juvenile detention center with no prospect of returning to in-person or remote learning anytime soon. The 15-year-old, identified only as Grace, has been in jail since May because she violated the terms of her probation by not completing her online coursework, according to a new report co-authored by ProPublica Illinois and the Detroit Free Press.

Grace, who is Black and has diagnosed ADHD, was on probation for fighting with her mom and stealing a cellphone from a classmate. After her school transitioned to remote learning on April 15, Grace said she felt unmotivated and overwhelmed by the work for her school, located in the predominantly white community of Beverly Hills, Mich.

That’s true of many students displaced from their schools, but, calling

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Arts students lurch toward freshman year of college in pandemic-induced upheaval

Arianna Carson, who plans to study dance at SUNY Purchase in the fall, is photographed near her home in Rowland Heights on July 6, 2020. <span class="copyright">(Christina House / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Arianna Carson, who plans to study dance at SUNY Purchase in the fall, is photographed near her home in Rowland Heights on July 6, 2020. (Christina House / Los Angeles Times)

As a dance student at the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts, Arianna Carson’s meticulously scheduled days often began at 5:15 am.

After commuting downtown to school, the 18-year-old spent the day balancing academic and dance classes. In the evenings, she would rehearse even more at a dance studio in Whittier until 9:30 p.m. By the time she began homework, it was usually around midnight.

When the pandemic forced her to take classes online, she transitioned her dance training to her living room and backyard.

The jam-packed days were crafted around Carson’s dream to become a professional modern dancer. She is scheduled to start this fall at SUNY Purchase Conservatory of Dance in New York, even though

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