How Low Can Dems Go On Unemployment Benefits?

WASHINGTON ― The extra $600 a week Congress added to unemployment benefits is set to expire in a matter of days, and Republicans and Democrats remain as far apart as ever on a deal to extend the money ― both between their parties and within them.

Senate Republicans have delayed unveiling their own legislation to extend the benefits all week, with Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) now saying Republicans in his chamber will release their bill on Monday. 

Democratic leaders won’t have much time to negotiate before benefits expire. In fact, even though the extra money was supposed to last until the end of July, many recipients will get their final $600 on Saturday or Sunday, because most states pay benefits on the weekend and July 31 is a Friday. (Regular state unemployment benefits, which are much lower, will continue.) 

And when lawmakers finally get around to hashing out final

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Aurora Police Warn Of Unemployment, Fake Check Scams

AURORA, IL — More than a dozen Aurora residents have been targeted by two increasingly popular scams, prompting police to issue a warning to residents.

At least 10 residents have filed reports with the Aurora Police Department after receiving debit cards in the mail to access unemployment benefits they never applied for. Several other residents have lost money after being defrauded while trying to sell items through online marketplaces like Craigslist and OfferUp, police said.

East Aurora Schools To Start Fall Semester With Remote Learning

Unemployment systems throughout the country are being targeted by fraudsters amid the coronavirus pandemic, according to Illinois Department of Employment Security officials. Gov. J.B. Pritzker said Wednesday that state officials are working with federal authorities to investigate “the nationwide fraud scheme impacting each state’s federal pandemic unemployment assistance program.”

West Aurora District 129 To Offer Remote, Hybrid Learning Plans

Any resident who receives a debit

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More Help Is Coming, But $600 Unemployment Bonus Will Lapse First

A second economic rescue package is on the horizon, one that will likely include another stimulus check, funding for small businesses and schools, additional jobless benefits and more. But as lawmakers debate the finer points, a critical provision of the first relief package is set to expire.

Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation, or FPUC, boosts all Americans’ unemployment payments by $600 per week, automatically. That provision of the $2.2 trillion CARES Act expires July 31 unless Congress acts immediately to extend it.

That deadline is according to the wording of the CARES Act, but the payments effectively end sooner. State unemployment agencies typically operate on a Sunday to Saturday schedule (or vice versa), meaning the last unemployment payment including the $600 bonus will be paid out either July 25 or July 26.

With the clock ticking, that means jobless Americans are likely to see a lapse in their unemployment payments —

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California unemployment falls, but virus surge likely to reverse job gains

California added 558,200 jobs from mid-May to mid-June and state unemployment fell from 16.4% to 14.9% — but don’t start celebrating yet. The numbers don’t account for the resurgence of COVID-19 cases throughout the U.S. and in California in the last half of June or the retreat in plans to reopen the economy. The numbers were released Friday morning by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, which slightly revised the earlier jobless figure from 16.3% to 16.4%.

Leisure and hospitality added the most jobs, at 292,500, benefiting from statewide reopenings of bars and dine-in restaurants, according to the California Employment Development Department. As of mid-June, that sector had regained more than a third of job losses from March and April. Construction jobs had the highest percentage gain, clawing back 68% of jobs lost during the pandemic. Government suffered the largest decline in jobs, at 36,300.

But the dial-back is bound

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Americans struggle with unemployment delays

For Cocoa, Florida, residents Christine Powell and her fiance, Robert Hammond, the relentless downward economic drag of the past six months has been suffocating.

First, Hammond was put on medical leave in December after he broke his hand. Then, just as the 49-year-old landscaper was about to return to his job, the pandemic hit. Hammond applied for unemployment insurance, but he hasn’t received a dime, and no one will answer his or Powell’s repeated calls to Florida’s Department of Economic Opportunity.

“I felt hopeless,” says Powell, 30, a mother of two who works as a supportive living coach at a behavioral health agency. She, too, has suffered a wage cut since the start of the pandemic. Her hours were reduced to just 10 per week, with her income keeping her barely above the threshold to qualify for unemployment.

Without enough money to pay their bills, Powell and Hammond have been 

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Hackers claimed $158 million in fake unemployment checks by stealing taxpayers’ identities

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About 58,000 fraudulent unemployment claims were discovered in Massachusetts, and actual unemployed people are the one who pay the biggest price.
About 58,000 fraudulent unemployment claims were discovered in Massachusetts, and actual unemployed people are the one who pay the biggest price.

When it comes to online scams, nothing is sacred. Malicious actors will take advantage of the elderly, target people trying to make positive change in the world, and even capitalize on others’ misfortune. It seems like a new scheme is hatched every day. The latest on our radar is the massive unemployment check fraud committed in Massachusetts following an uptick in pandemic-related job loss.

The criminal activity was first detected by the Massachusetts unemployment systems as part of a nationwide scam back in May, according to Massachusetts Live. As of July, the count is 58,000 fraudulent claims and a

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$600 bonus unemployment benefits end soon. Here’s how to prepare

Though America’s unemployment rate fell to 11.1% in June as employers hired 4.8 million more workers, another 17.8 million were still out of luck. They remained jobless, the government reported on Thursday.

Plus, 1.4 million more people signed up for unemployment benefits last week. So, while the job market is improving, it’s still pretty grim — thanks to the coronavirus.

A weekly benefit boost has made unemployment a little easier for those who lost their jobs to the pandemic, but soon they’ll have to survive without the bonus money.

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act — the “CARES Act,” which also brought you those $1,200 stimulus checks — provides an extra $600 per week of unemployment through July 31. Republicans who control the U.S. Senate don’t want to provide an extension.

Standard unemployment payouts vary from state to state, and depending on where you live you may have

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LinkedIn, Microsoft launch free Learning Path job training courses to fight coronavirus unemployment

Microsoft and LinkedIn want to put a dent in the nation – and the world’s – unemployment numbers.

The software giant and the professional networking site, which Microsoft acquired in 2016 for $26.2 billion, identified in-demand jobs and are offering free, online training to help job seekers improve their skills and land positions.

LinkedIn data showed 10 specific jobs with the most current openings and a four-year trend of being in demand, pay “a livable wage,” and have skills that can be learned online and remotely. LinkedIn’s CEO Ryan Roslansky posted the details on the site’s blog about the initiative.

LinkedIn’s top 10 in-demand jobs

1. Software developer 

2. Sales representative 

3. Project manager 

4. IT Administrator 

5. Customer service specialist 

6. Digital marketer ​ 

7. IT support/Help desk 

8. Graphic designer 

9. Financial analyst  

10. Data analyst 

LinkedIn and Microsoft created Learning Path training modules for those 10 positions.

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‘It breaks your heart.’ California should audit embattled unemployment agency, lawmaker says

Citing relentless consumer anger over delays and confusion in dealing with the state’s unemployment agency, Assemblyman Jim Patterson Friday formally requested an audit of the state’s beleaguered Employment Development Department.

Among his requests: A close look at the agency’s decisions to award years of contracts for modernizing and maintaining the system to Deloitte Consulting LLC.

The Sacramento Bee reported Thursday that EDD has repeatedly used Deloitte to help build and maintain its IT systems for years, despite warnings from state watchdogs that the systems were often delayed and over budget.

Patterson, a Fresno Republican, listed his frustrations In a lengthy, detailed request that described his experiences with infuriated constituents upset with EDD.

“Every single day people are messaging me, saying, Jim, nobody’s returning my call. Or they denied my application for unknown reasons. It breaks your heart,” he told The Sacramento Bee, echoing what other lawmakers have found and readers

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Online scams due to COVID, protests, unemployment in 2020

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Online scams can come in many forms and via any kind of device. (Photo: Getty)

A worldwide pandemic, mass unemployment and nationwide protests over racial injustice — there are many important issues occupying our collective attention. Sadly, this kind of large-scale distraction is fertile ground for hackers.

“We have the COVID disaster combined with the economic disaster combined with the protests,” said Adam Levin, cyber security expert and founder of CyberScout, to Yahoo Life. ”We are now in the middle of what can be considered a perfect storm for scammers.”

Levin says that the current climate of our nation has set the stage for an online scam trifecta: motive, means, and opportunity.

“The motive for

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