Back to school? Despite CDC recommendations, most major schools going online as COVID-19 cases spike

As COVID-19 cases rise in most states, the prospect of in-person learning this fall at the country’s major school districts is becoming increasingly remote.

So far, nine of the top 15 school systems by enrollment plan to start the fall semester online, with two more currently planning a hybrid of in-person and online classes, according to Education Week magazine’s reopening tracker. Other top districts shifted school schedules later, hoping for cases to decline or for teachers and administrators to have more time to plan for the school year. 

As back-to-school season approaches, it’s highly likely the majority of big districts will start learning remotely while they work out plans for socially distant reopenings, said Annette Anderson, deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Safe and Healthy Schools.

The biggest factor: whether the community where the school is located is seeing infection rates decrease, said Kristi Wilson, superintendent of the

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The 20 best back to school things you can buy at Target

Get all your school essentials at the Red Bullet.
Get all your school essentials at the Red Bullet.

— Recommendations are independently chosen by Reviewed’s editors. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission.

Back in the day, Target was always my first stop for back-to-school shopping. While office supply stores might have a wider selection of supplies, there was always something about the back-to-school section at Target that made me particularly excited for the upcoming school year.

Though school in the fall might look a little different this year due to COVID-19, and many classes might still be virtual, it’s still a good idea to grab some new school supplies. Plus, you can shop for it all online at Target or opt for curbside pickup, if you’re trying to limit your time spent in stores.

From basic school supplies to the top tech gadgets, here are the 20 best back-to-school things you can buy at

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As the School Year Approaches, Education May Become the Pandemic’s Latest Casualty

Children tumble off a yellow school bus, where every other seat is marked with caution tape. Wearing whimsical masks—one has whiskers, another rhinestones—they wait to get their temperatures checked before filing into the one-story school building. Inside Wesley Elementary in Middletown, Conn., plastic shields rise from desks, and cartoon posters exhort children to cover your cough. In the middle of a lesson, teacher Susan Velardi picks up her laptop and pans it so her students can see the screen. “Look,” she tells them, “I have a friend that’s joining us at home!”

There’s a new set of ground rules in Velardi’s classroom. “Your mask is on, and your mask stays like this. If we go outside if it’s nice, we have to sit apart,” she tells the students, who will enter third grade in the fall. When one tries to high-five her, she compromises with an “air high five.” Other

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Back to school? Most major schools are heading toward online class as COVID-19 cases spike

As COVID-19 cases rise in most states, the prospect of in-person learning this fall at the country’s major school districts is becoming increasingly remote.

As of late Wednesday, 11 of the top 15 school systems by enrollment were already either planning to start the fall semester online or in a hybrid of in-person and online classes, according to Education Week magazine’s reopening tracker. Still other top districts have shifted school schedules later, hoping for cases to decline or for teachers and administrators to have more time to plan for the school year. 

As back-to-school season approaches, it’s highly likely the majority of big districts will start learning remotely while they work out plans for socially distant reopenings, said Annette Anderson, deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Safe and Healthy Schools.

The biggest factor: whether the community where the school is located is seeing infection rates decrease, said Kristi

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Baltimore teacher delivers for her school families

Sarita Sullivan quit her job in Washington, D.C., five years ago and moved to Baltimore to make a difference in the aftermath of Freddie Gray’s death.

“I felt like I needed to do something more,” she said.

She quickly fell in love with the city, living in Mount Vernon and Charles Village before moving to her current neighborhood, Midtown.

She became a teacher in the hope of making a difference in the lives of the next generation.

As a special education teacher, specializing in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten, at Belmont Elementary School in West Baltimore, Sullivan has bonded with her students and their families.

“The whole … school closure was difficult,” Sullivan said. “I didn’t get to say goodbye to my students. Because working in special ed I became close to the families. It was difficult that I couldn’t see them every day.”

She noticed that a number of her students

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Watsonville Students Likely Won’t Return To School This Fall

WATSONVILLE, CA — The Santa Cruz County Office of Education confirmed Monday that it does not anticipate students will return to in-person classes in the fall.

That’s because Santa Cruz County met the criteria for the state monitoring list, which indicates state public health officials are keeping an eye on concerning COVID-19 statistics, wrote Pajaro Valley Unified School District Superintendent Michelle Rodriguez and other county schools officials in an open letter Monday. Of particular concern was the fact that the COVID-19 case count has been higher than 100 cases per 100,000 people for more than three consecutive days, school officials said.

While Santa Cruz County had not been added the state’s list as of Tuesday evening, county Health Officer Gail Newel previously said that she expected Santa Cruz County to join its neighboring counties on the monitoring list.

In order for a school district to open for in-class instruction, it

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Santa Cruz Students Likely Won’t Return To School This Fall

SANTA CRUZ, CA — The Santa Cruz County Office of Education confirmed Monday that it does not anticipate students will return to in-person classes in the fall.

That’s because Santa Cruz County met the criteria for the state monitoring list, which indicates state public health officials are keeping an eye on concerning COVID-19 statistics, wrote Santa Cruz City Schools Superintendent Kris Munro and other county schools officials in an open letter Monday. Of particular concern was the fact that the COVID-19 case count has been higher than 100 cases per 100,000 people for more than three consecutive days.

While Santa Cruz County had not been added the state’s list as of Tuesday evening, county Health Officer Gail Newel previously said that she expected Santa Cruz County to join its neighboring counties on the monitoring list.

In order for a school district to open for in-class instruction, it must be in

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What to do on Friday nights this fall without high school football

Denzel Washington tackles the 2000 role of coach Herman Boone in "Remember the Titans." <span class="copyright">(Tracy Bennett / Buena Vista Pictures)</span>
Denzel Washington tackles the 2000 role of coach Herman Boone in “Remember the Titans.” (Tracy Bennett / Buena Vista Pictures)

With the CIF deciding to delay the start of the high school football season until Jan. 8 because of uncertainty and safety concerns over the COVID-19 pandemic, teens and their families are going to need to find a substitute plan for what to do on Friday nights this fall.

Let’s call it “Friday Night Lights” revised.

Among the possible alternatives:

A TV classic. Subscribe to Hulu and watch all five seasons of the TV series “Friday Night Lights.”

A film classic. Make Friday night a family night to watch your favorite sports movie. Here are a few to get you started: “Blindside,” “Remember the Titans,” “Hoosiers,” “Mighty Ducks,” “Field of Dreams.”

A little football. You may be able to stream seven-on-seven football games from your nearest park.

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Teachers sue Florida governor over school reopening plan

The Florida Education Association, a union representing 145,000 educators, filed a lawsuit on Monday against Governor Ron DeSantis and the state’s Department of Education in an attempt to stop schools from reopening at the end of August. The lawsuit argues Florida’s plan to reopen schools is unsafe due to the coronavirus pandemic, and therefore violates the state constitution, CBS Miami reports.

“The Florida Constitution mandates ‘[a]dequate provision shall be made by law for a uniform, efficient, safe, secure, and high quality system of free public schools,'” the lawsuit says. “The Defendants’ unconstitutional handling of their duties has infringed upon this mandate and requires the courts to issue necessary and appropriate relief.”

The lawsuit also names Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran and Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez as defendants. 

“The governor needs to accept the reality of the situation here in Florida, where the virus is surging out of control,” FEA

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Petaluma Students May Have To Go Back To School Online

PETALUMA, CA — If Sonoma County is still on the state of California’s COVID-19 coronavirus watchlist when the fall semester begins, students of Petaluma City Schools and all other school districts and charter schools in the county, will have to start the school year with online classes, according to back-to-school guidelines spelled out Friday by California Gov. Gavin Newsom.

Counties where schools are not able to start the 2020-2021 school year in physical classrooms must be taken off the watchlist and remain off the list for at least two weeks before students can return to on-campus learning, Newsom said.

In response to Newsom’s orders for California schools in the age of coronavirus, Sonoma County Superintendent of Schools Steve Herrington released a statement and said he would meet with Sonoma County’s 38 superintendents, as well as charter school and private school leaders, early next week to discuss this new guidance in

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