What Is The Hold Up? How Software Will Change Contact Centers

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Silicon Valley has talked about software disrupting customer experiences for decades. In the end, it was surprising that an actual virus, not a viral app, became the customer experience disrupter of the century. COVID-19 unleashed unprecedented stress on physical and digital businesses alike. It increased the complexity and volume of customer inquiries across nearly every business vertical — and shifted all of these inquiries into the digital realm. Today, we don’t need software to disrupt customer experiences. Software is our best hope to stabilize them.

Just when customers needed faster service and more compassion, the websites went down and the hold times stretched to hours. Today, companies are scrambling to mobilize additional human resources while COVID-19 cases continue to increase and offices remain closed. For example, Lululemon is reassigning 800 workers from its retail stores to the contact center. Alorica, a business process outsourcing company, recently announced 4,000 new jobs

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How to edit a Microsoft PowerPoint template to change its default color theme, font, and more

It's easy to edit a PowerPoint template.
It’s easy to edit a PowerPoint template.

SeventyFour/Getty Images

  • You can edit a PowerPoint template by adjusting its theme settings.

  • Your options for editing templates look fairly similar whether you make them on the desktop or web version of PowerPoint, though the latter is more limited.

  • While the preset options PowerPoint offers you are helpful, you may want to edit the default font, colors, and more.

  • Visit Business Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

Microsoft PowerPoint offers many templates to kickstart your projects — and you can adjust these presets with a few easy clicks.

Whether you need to match your latest presentation to your work’s logo colors or have a different preference for a photo slideshow, you can make those changes in several locations. You can also edit fonts, color schemes, accents, backgrounds, and more. Adjustments can be made in the toolbar at the top or in the

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We Need to Change How We Share Our Personal Data Online in the Age of COVID-19

A few months into the coronavirus pandemic, the web is more central to humanity’s functioning than I could have imagined 30 years ago. It’s now a lifeline for billions of people and businesses worldwide. But I’m more frustrated now with the current state of the web than ever before. We could be doing so much better.

COVID-19 underscores how urgently we need a new approach to organizing and sharing personal data. You only have to look at the limited scope and the widespread adoption challenges of the pandemic apps offered by various tech companies and governments.

Think of all the data about your life accumulated in the various applications you use – social gatherings, frequent contacts, recent travel, health, fitness, photos, and so on. Why is it that none of that information can be combined and used to help you, especially during a crisis?

It’s because you aren’t in control

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Facebook fails to control hate speech. Will an advertiser boycott change anything?

Jonathan Greenblatt, the chief executive and national director of the Anti-Defamation League, was not all that optimistic in advance of the online meeting that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg had set up with him and the heads of other civil rights groups last Tuesday.

Many of them had been talking to Facebook about its tolerance of hate groups and racist and anti-Semitic postings on the giant social media company’s website.

They had submitted 10 recommendations they said could result immediately in “real progress.” Facebook had stated that it takes “a zero tolerance approach” to hateful posts on its services by removing them.

We’re talking about literally the most sophisticated advertising platform in the history of capitalism. The idea that they can’t find the Nazis on their platform is just laughable.

Jonathan Greenblatt, Anti-Defamation League

Yet the very morning of the meeting, ADL’s researchers turned up a posting

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Facebook has failed to control hate speech. Will advertiser demands change anything?

Jonathan Greenblatt, the chief executive and national director of the Anti-Defamation League, was not all that optimistic in advance of the online meeting that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg had set up with him and the heads of other civil rights groups last Tuesday.

Many of them had been talking to Facebook about its tolerance of hate groups and racist and anti-Semitic postings on the giant social media company’s website.

They had submitted 10 recommendations they said could result immediately in “real progress.” Facebook had stated that it takes “a zero tolerance approach” to hateful posts on its services by removing them.

We’re talking about literally the most sophisticated advertising platform in the history of capitalism. The idea that they can’t find the Nazis on their platform is just laughable.

Jonathan Greenblatt, Anti-Defamation League

Yet the very morning of the meeting, ADL’s researchers turned up a posting

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‘Shocking level of bipartisan support’ means Big Tech is facing big (and costly) change

Once seen as a critical tool for internet platforms to police lewd and objectionable online speech, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act has gained growing bipartisan support as a law in need of fixing.

Enacted in 1996, Section 230 exempts online platforms from liability for most user-generated speech. President Donald Trump has taken aim at changing the law in a fight against Twitter (TWTR), putting tech giants in legal and regulatory crosshairs that are likely to outlast the current election cycle.

Democrats and Republicans alike voice increasing antipathy over sweeping liability protections that 230 affords to all online platforms — including Facebook (FB), Instagram, YouTube (GOOG) (GOOGL). All told, experts say it’s becoming clear that change is coming.

“If Trump is reelected, frankly even if he isn’t reelected, you might see variations on this proposal coming into some type of effect next year, with a shocking level of bipartisan … Read More

Will the Facebook advertising boycott force the social media giant to change? Not likely

Hundreds of advertisers say they won’t spend money on Facebook in July or beyond over concerns the social media company isn’t doing enough to stop hate speech.  But the exodus of spenders may not be enough to push CEO Mark Zuckerberg to make the level of change that critics are demanding. 

Critics have an initial list of 10 recommendations that they say would help Facebook corral hate speech and make civil rights a priority when moderating content.

Zuckerberg and top executives, who have agreed to meet with the civil rights groups behind the Stop Hate for Profit boycott this week, plan to release the company’s third civil rights audit, which Facebook says will address many of the activists’ concerns, as well as other policy changes that were already under consideration.

The pressure on Facebook seems intense, but it may not be as powerful as the headlines make it appear.

Brands

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How COVID-19 will change higher education

<span class="caption">COVID-19 has altered nearly every aspect of higher education.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://www.apimages.com/metadata/Index/Virus-Outbreak-New-Orleans-Graduation/decbb9ee12974bf2b432bea0909dacb4/5/0" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Gerald Herbert/AP">Gerald Herbert/AP</a></span>
COVID-19 has altered nearly every aspect of higher education. Gerald Herbert/AP

_Editor’s note: From time to time, we ask the leaders of our country’s colleges and universities to address some of the most pressing issues in higher education. Here, the presidents of three universities answer six critical questions about the future of higher education as its being reshaped by COVID-19.

Beyond just moving online, how is COVID-19 forcing colleges to change?

<span class="caption">Walter M. Kimbrough, president of Dillard University.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.dillard.edu/_office-of-the-president/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:'from www.dillard.edu'">'from www.dillard.edu'</a></span>
Walter M. Kimbrough, president of Dillard University. ‘from www.dillard.edu’

Walter M. Kimbrough, president of Dillard University: The disruption is causing us to rethink much of how we operate. Do we offer the right majors? How much time do students need to complete a class or a degree? How can we use technology more effectively? I think all of these will impact conversations going forward, but I also think COVID-19 has reminded us that as humans, we need personal interaction.

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U.S. senator to change anti-child porn bill over Google, Facebook encryption concerns

By Nandita Bose

(Reuters) – U.S. legislation aimed at stopping online child sexual abuse material is likely to be amended to address concerns of platforms like Google and Facebook that the proposed law goes too far to weaken privacy protections for ordinary users, according to a draft of the bill seen by Reuters.

Tech companies, currently protected from lawsuits over content posted by users, feared the original bill would hurt their ability to offer protections like end-to-end encryption. That technology scrambles messages so they can be deciphered only by the sender and intended recipient, a feature critical to the online privacy of billions of people.

In a new draft authored by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, The Eliminating Abuse and Rampant Neglect of Interactive Technologies Act of 2019, or EARN IT Act, makes compliance with a set of controversial “best practices” voluntary instead of mandatory for companies such as

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U.S. senator to change anti-child porn bill over Google, Facebook encryption concerns: draft

By Nandita Bose

(Reuters) – U.S. legislation aimed at stopping online child sexual abuse material is likely to be amended to address concerns of platforms like Google and Facebook that the proposed law goes too far to weaken privacy protections for ordinary users, according to a draft of the bill seen by Reuters.

Tech companies, currently protected from lawsuits over content posted by users, feared the original bill would hurt their ability to offer protections like end-to-end encryption. That technology scrambles messages so they can be deciphered only by the sender and intended recipient, a feature critical to the online privacy of billions of people.

In a new draft authored by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, The Eliminating Abuse and Rampant Neglect of Interactive Technologies Act of 2019, or EARN IT Act, makes compliance with a set of controversial “best practices” voluntary instead of mandatory for companies such as

Read More