Chrissy Teigen Apologizes to Megan Thee Stallion Over “S–tty” Twitter Joke

Chrissy Teigen found herself in “hot girl” water on Friday night.

The 34-year-old cookbook author took to Twitter to partake in one of the online memes taking over the social media platform. She decided to join in on the fun by posting a joke about Megan Thee Stallion, which didn’t sit right with the singer’s fans.

For some context, television writer Nell Scovell posted, “I have a Charles Manson joke and it kills.” That particular message caught Chrissy’s attention because she quote tweeted Nell’s with a one-liner of her own, except she referenced the “Hot Girl Summer” rapper.

“I have a megan thee stallion joke but it needs to be twerked on,” the Cravings author wrote in a since-deleted post, which was captured and re-uploaded by Twitter users.

“(Before you start, I love her),” Chrissy clarified. “I’ll delete because you guys are sooooo f–king annoying. Just

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The CEOs of Apple, Google, Facebook, and Amazon are set to testify before Congress in a historic antitrust hearing next week. Here’s what’s at stake for each company.

From left to right, Mark Zuckerberg, Sundar Pichai, Tim Cook, and Jeff Bezos.
From left to right, Mark Zuckerberg, Sundar Pichai, Tim Cook, and Jeff Bezos.

Getty/Carsten Koall/Michael Kovac/Business Insider composite

  • The tech CEOs of Apple, Google, Amazon, and Facebook will appear before Congress in a first-of-its-kind hearing on Wednesday.

  • They’ll be testifying as part of an antitrust investigation into the dominance of digital platforms that has been running since last June. The CEOs, who will likely appear remotely over video, will have to defend the growing power of their tech companies to skeptical lawmakers.

  • Here’s why each CEO has been asked to appear, the types of questions they will likely be asked, and how the day might play out.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The CEOs of four tech giants will appear before Congress next week, where they’ll have to defend their companies’ growing power to skeptical lawmakers.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Apple CEO Tim Cook, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg,

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American teachers are facing ‘a perfect storm’ of crises amid the coronavirus pandemic

The compounding stresses of the coronavirus pandemic, the sudden transition to remote learning, and the politicization of schools reopening are burning out teachers.

“I was on the verge of leaving,” an art teacher from Connecticut, who teaches kindergarten through fifth grade but did not want to be identified out of fear of professional retaliation, told Yahoo Finance. “The reason why I stayed truthfully was because of my loan payments.”

According to a survey by Horace Mann of 2,490 educators in the U.S. in June, 34% of them are considering leaving the profession due to the financial stress they’re feeling. 

“It’s like a perfect storm happening right now because the federal government hasn’t passed any legislation to give states any money,” Tish Jennings, an associate professor at the University of Virginia who studies how stress affects teachers, told Yahoo Finance. “ And so when they don’t have enough money in the

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What Harvard MBA Virtual Admissions Events Are Like

It was the first virtual graduation in the history of Harvard Business School

The COVID-19 pandemic forced b-schools across the nation to shift their courses online back in March. And following suit, many in-person events and functions had to be canceled only to be brought back in a virtual state.

At Harvard Business School, two primary admissions programs – the Summer Venture in Management Program (SVMP) and Peek Weekend—went virtual this summer due to the pandemic. Despite the fact that attendees didn’t meet in-person, the virtual gatherings still saw great success, according to an article by the HBS Newsroom.

“One silver lining of the coronavirus pandemic is that it provided an opportunity to expand virtual admissions events beyond what we thought was possible,” Kate Bennett, director of marketing for MBA Admissions at HBS, tells Newsroom. “We were able to reach a far higher number of prospective students—an unprecedented number of

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American teachers face ‘a perfect storm’ of crises amid the coronavirus pandemic

The compounding stresses of the coronavirus pandemic, the sudden transition to remote learning, and the politicization of schools reopening are burning out teachers.

“I was on the verge of leaving,” an art teacher from Connecticut, who teaches kindergarten through fifth grade but did not want to be identified out of fear of professional retaliation, told Yahoo Finance. “The reason why I stayed truthfully was because of my loan payments.”

According to a survey by Horace Mann of 2,490 educators in the U.S. in June, 34% of them are considering leaving the profession due to the financial stress they’re feeling. 

“It’s like a perfect storm happening right now because the federal government hasn’t passed any legislation to give states any money,” Tish Jennings, an associate professor at the University of Virginia who studies how stress affects teachers, told Yahoo Finance. “ And so when they don’t have enough money in the

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Comic-Con 2020 ‘At Home’ Saturday Schedule

Click here to read the full article.

To use the words of prophet and frequent convention attendee Hunter S. Thompson, when the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. This year, the professional weirdness of Comic-Con has taken a twist, as the four-day event will take place exclusively online.

To their credit, organizers are trying to replicate the commercialized fan-friendly confines of the San Diego Convention Center as much as possible: there is the traditional souvenir book featuring a pretty sweet drawing of Ray Bradbury on a T. Rex on the cover that is available for free .pdf download (and featuring click-through advertisements!), and you can print your own badge (sponsored by Amazon Prime Video!) to wear as you sit in front of your screen at home. The Comic-Con homepage also will take you to an online Exhibit Hall, where there will be interactive exhibits and events offered by vendors.

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3 New York City businesses on what it’s been like reopening in the first U.S. epicenter of the pandemic

Subscribe to How To Reopen, our weekly newsletter on what it takes to reboot business in the midst of a pandemic.

New York City quickly became the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States this past spring. As the novel coronavirus has spread rapidly elsewhere nationwide, New York has been able to bring cases down and began to reopen businesses this summer, making it a possible blueprint for other American cities once they have the virus under control.

Anyone who has ventured out to a store or small business that is not a grocery store or a pharmacy (which are also quite different than they used to be but remained open during the shutdown) knows that retail experiences and services are not like what they once were. There are a lot of new rules put in place to keep customers and employees safe, which might look very different

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200 allegations of sexual misconduct in gaming were revealed in a recent spreadsheet. Streamers say it reflects sexism they face every day.

Women who stream on Twitch say the gaming landscape remains sexist and leads to harassment.
Women who stream on Twitch say the gaming landscape remains sexist and leads to harassment.

Leonardo Alvarez Hernandez/Getty Images

  • Recent allegations of sexual misconduct have rocked the gaming world.

  • Several women who use the popular livestreaming platform Twitch told Insider that the allegations represented a larger problem of sexism in the gaming world that makes harassment exceedingly common.

  • Though women are continually challenging the male gamer stereotype, research has found that sexism persists in gaming.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

In June, dozens of women in gaming made waves with allegations of sexual harassment and misconduct against popular streamers as part of a new wave of the #MeToo movement that’s stretched across industries, indicting actors, media professionals, influencers, and more.

Most of those accused of misconduct in gaming were personalities on Amazon’s Twitch, the largest game-streaming platform.

As more details came out on various platforms, Jessica Richey, who streams

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Meet Robert Mercer, the conservative billionaire who was a megadonor for Trump during the 2016 campaign but is notably absent in 2020

Robert Mercer and his daughter, Rebekah.
Robert Mercer and his daughter, Rebekah.

Sean Zanni/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

  • Robert Mercer and his daughter, Rebekah, were amongst the most prominent conservative megadonors in 2016, extending unwavering support to President Trump.

  • So far, Mercer has only made one six-figure donation to Trump’s reelection campaign.

  • An influential figure in the hedge-fund industry and a computer scientist, Mercer made principal investments in both Breitbart News and Cambridge Analytica in the past.

  • The Mercer Family Foundation and Trump Campaign did not immediately respond to Business Insider’s request for comment.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A billionaire donor who bankrolled President Trump’s 2016 campaign has been notably absent during his reelection efforts.

Robert Mercer, a hedge fund manager, donated upwards of $25 million dollars in the previous election cycle across multiple conservative efforts. So far, Mercer and his daughter, Rebekah, have made a single $355,200 donation to Trump’s reelection effort. 

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Back to school? Despite CDC recommendations, most major schools going online as COVID-19 cases spike

As COVID-19 cases rise in most states, the prospect of in-person learning this fall at the country’s major school districts is becoming increasingly remote.

So far, nine of the top 15 school systems by enrollment plan to start the fall semester online, with two more currently planning a hybrid of in-person and online classes, according to Education Week magazine’s reopening tracker. Other top districts shifted school schedules later, hoping for cases to decline or for teachers and administrators to have more time to plan for the school year. 

As back-to-school season approaches, it’s highly likely the majority of big districts will start learning remotely while they work out plans for socially distant reopenings, said Annette Anderson, deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Safe and Healthy Schools.

The biggest factor: whether the community where the school is located is seeing infection rates decrease, said Kristi Wilson, superintendent of the

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