Connecticut preparing for all schools to open, but state planning for online education if COVID-19 surges. Final decision will be made in a month, Gov. Lamont says.

Connecticut is preparing for three different scenarios for the opening of schools and a final decision on how education will look will be made in a month, Gov. Ned Lamont said Monday.

Educators and the state are planning for all learning to take place in schools, but that could be modified to a mix of online and in-class learning or, if there is a coronavirus surge, all education will shift to at-home learning.

“Things change,‘’ Gov. Lamont said at his afternoon COVID-19 briefing, noting that San Diego and Los Angeles decided Monday to shift to an online learning model. “We still have very low metrics compared to San Diego and Los Angeles and most of these other states.”

How schools look “is going to be subject to where we are a month from now,‘’ Lamont said.

Fran Rabinowitz, executive director of the Connecticut Assoociation of Public School Superintendents, said that

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Is Your Boss Discriminating Against You for Being a Mom? Here’s What to Do

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We don’t have to remind you that it’s been a rough four months for working parents. According to a recent survey from Udemy, 90 percent of working moms feel that childcare and homeschooling are keeping them from doing their jobs, and 78 percent of working parents are concerned that this “new normal” will have a long-lasting effect on their career and quality of life. That certainly was the case for Drisana Rios, who was working for an insurance company in San Diego until last month, when she said she was fired for going to HR about her boss’ discrimination against her as a mother working from home.

In June, Rios went viral with her Instagram post about how her boss had complained frequently about her children making noise during online meetings.

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“He wanted me to figure out a way to

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How ‘Take Me to the World’ Became One of the Best Sondheim Concerts Ever

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Raúl Esparza thought he would die of embarrassment when the much-touted April 26 90th birthday concert for Stephen Sondheim didn’t launch on time. The two-and-a-half-hour video file of pre-recorded songs was so huge that it took 45 minutes for Broadway.com to upload. There was nothing the concert host and Broadway theater star could do but wait for the event to be ready to blast out to the world. If anything, the technical glitch, which instantly built into a social media hailstorm via such #Sondheim90 tweeters and concert participants as @Lin_Manuel and @RandyRainbow, increased viewership when “Take Me to the World: A Sondheim 90th Birthday Celebration” finally hit YouTube. 

So far, the concert held on the 50th anniversary of the opening of Sondheim’s original Broadway production of “Company” has been viewed 2.2 million times and raised over $500 million for ASTEP (Artists Striving To

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The San Francisco tech CEO who was filmed in a racist rant against an Asian-American family has resigned

The Bernardus Garden at Bernardus Lodge & Spa on October 02, 2019 in Carmel Valley, California.
The Bernardus Garden at Bernardus Lodge & Spa on October 02, 2019 in Carmel Valley, California.

Rich Fury/Getty Images for Mercedes-Benz and Glamour

  • The tech CEO who was filmed berating an Asian family with racist remarks has resigned, per a report in the San Francisco Chronicle.

  • The move comes after the executive, Michael Lofthouse of Solid8, was filmed saying “Trump gonna f— you” and “you f—— Asian piece of s—” in a video that has since gone viral.

  • According to Solid8’s Linkedin profile, the company employs 2 to 10 people, and its primary address is listed at 650 California Street in San Francisco, an address also listed as a WeWork space.

  • Many have confused Lofthouse’s firm with a UK based consulting company of the same name. The managing director of Solid8 Consulting told Business Insider in a statement that her company is “being incorrectly attacked for racism and hatred.”

  • Visit

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States sue Trump administration over college student visa rule

WASHINGTON – Seventeen states and the District of Columbia sued President Donald Trump’s administration Monday to block a new rule that would force international college students to leave United States if they’re only enrolled in online classes this fall.

Some universities are planning to offer classes entirely online because of concerns about the pandemic. The new rule could be devastating for students and universities alike. 

The lawsuit, filed by 18 attorneys general against the Department of Homeland Security, calls the new rule a “cruel, abrupt and unlawful action to expel international students amidst the pandemic that has wrought death and disruption across the United States.”

The Trump administration issued the new immigration policy last week, as it seeks to force universities and K-12 schools to reopen in the fall despite soaring COVID-19 infections across the country. The lawsuit highlights a July 6 tweet from President Trump declaring: “SCHOOLS MUST OPEN

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The newest MacBook Pro just got a $200 price drop, right in time for back to school

Apple's latest MacBook Pro just got a steep price cut.
Apple’s latest MacBook Pro just got a steep price cut.

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While students across the nation prepare for virtual learning this year via online classes, and many adults continue to work remotely from home, owning a high-speed laptop has never been more essential. Apple, of course, is one of the most dependable brands if you’re looking to invest in a fancy new computer. Its newest MacBook Pro has a stunning display and an array of useful features, but with such renowned quality comes a high price tag. Luckily, you can score an amazing deal on the latest model on Amazon right now.

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For a limited time, the 16-inch MacBook Pro in Space Grey,

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Harvard’s international students are begging the school to let them come to campus in the fall, citing fears of being stuck in unstable home environments if they’re forced to leave the US

One student is circulating a "Hear Us Harvard" petition asking the university to better support international students.
One student is circulating a “Hear Us Harvard” petition asking the university to better support international students.

Charles Krupa/AP

  • Last week, ICE released guidance stating that international students would not be allowed back into the US in the fall unless they were taking in-person classes at their university.

  • This poses a problem for Harvard’s international students, as the school recently said classes in the fall would be entirely remote.

  • Students told Business Insider that these regulations pose serious problems for them, including the difficulty of keeping up with online courses while in a different time zone and with poor internet connection.

  • Some also face unsafe or unaccommodating home situations, making it even harder for them to find a proper place to keep up with their studies.

  • Rachael Dane, a spokesperson for Harvard, told Business Insider that “the overwhelming reason to deliver all instruction remotely is Harvard’s commitment to protecting the

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Americans struggle with unemployment delays

For Cocoa, Florida, residents Christine Powell and her fiance, Robert Hammond, the relentless downward economic drag of the past six months has been suffocating.

First, Hammond was put on medical leave in December after he broke his hand. Then, just as the 49-year-old landscaper was about to return to his job, the pandemic hit. Hammond applied for unemployment insurance, but he hasn’t received a dime, and no one will answer his or Powell’s repeated calls to Florida’s Department of Economic Opportunity.

“I felt hopeless,” says Powell, 30, a mother of two who works as a supportive living coach at a behavioral health agency. She, too, has suffered a wage cut since the start of the pandemic. Her hours were reduced to just 10 per week, with her income keeping her barely above the threshold to qualify for unemployment.

Without enough money to pay their bills, Powell and Hammond have been 

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2020 Election Costs Soar In Prep For Virus Voting

WASHINGTON, DC — The demand for mail-in ballots is surging. Election workers need training. And polling booths might have to be outfitted with protective shields because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

As officials prepare for the Nov. 3 election, one certainty is clear: It’s coming with a big price tag.
“Election officials don’t have nearly the resources to make the preparations and changes they need to make to run an election in a pandemic,” said Wendy Weiser, head of the Brennan Center for Justice’s democracy program. “We are seeing this all over the place.”

The pandemic has sent state and local officials scrambling to prepare for an election like few others, an extraordinary endeavor during a presidential contest, as virus cases rise across much of the U.S.

COVID-19-related worries are bringing demands for steps to make sure elections just four months away are safe. But long-promised federal aid to help cash-starved

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Fall semester starts next month at UC Merced. What will happen to classes amid COVID-19?

UC Merced plans to open campus for the fall semester on Aug. 26 with a hybrid mode — with some classes being offered on-campus and while others will be online.

How do to that safely, however, remains a work in progress, as coronavirus case numbers surge statewide and the central San Joaquin Valley.

Campus administrators say there will be safety guidelines in place for students, faculty and staff which include health screenings, face masks and social distancing guidelines.

The amount of students actually returning to campus in August will likely be a small percentage of the 8,847 undergraduate and graduate students who were on campus in the fall of 2019 as UC Merced officials attempt to limit the number of people physically at the school..

In a letter sent to the campus community recently, UC Merced Chief Resilience Officer Andrew Boyd explained “the goal is to minimize person-to-person contact on

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