How Ocado went from understated British grocer to an $18.4 billion tech giant, as the coronavirus pandemic confirms the future of grocery shopping is online

"Bots" are seen on the grid (or "The Hive") of Ocado's "smart platform" in Andover, Britain, on May 1, 2018.
“Bots” are seen on the grid (or “The Hive”) of Ocado’s “smart platform” in Andover, Britain, on May 1, 2018.

REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

  • As grocery stores worldwide experienced stockpiling, long lines, and health worries amid the coronavirus pandemic, millions of people turned to shopping online.

  • It has been a goldrush for the British company Ocado, an online-only grocery marketplace that also operates technology for supermarket giants worldwide.

  • Ocado was the best performing stock on the FTSE 100 in the second quarter of 2020, and, in May, Ocado raised over $1 billion to grow its services.

  • It is now betting big on its US expansion, hoping to convert Americans to grocery shopping online.

  • Huge challenges remain, though. Many Americans are still reluctant to buy food they can’t see in person, and some fear the current online pandemic-driven boom could prove a one-off.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The coronavirus pandemic

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What meeting your spouse online has in common with arranged marriage

<span class="caption">David and Elizabeth Weinlick, a Minnesota couple who began their life together through an arranged marriage </span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://www.apimages.com/metadata/Index/Arranged-Wedding-Renewing-Vows/c700db29a86948808707a64f7ff11777/21/0" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:AP Photo/Kyle Potter">AP Photo/Kyle Potter</a></span>
David and Elizabeth Weinlick, a Minnesota couple who began their life together through an arranged marriage AP Photo/Kyle Potter

Most Americans who get married today believe they are choosing their own partners after falling in love with them. Arranged marriages, which remain common in some parts of the world, are a rarity here.

But while doing research about arranged marriages, I’ve made a surprising observation: These seemingly different kinds of matrimony may be beginning to converge.

Couples who ostensibly marry after spontaneously falling in love increasingly do that with some help from online dating services or after meeting through hookup apps. And modern arranged marriages – including my own – are becoming more like love marriages.

Going strong in India

According to some estimates, more than half of the marriages taking place around the world each year are arranged. They are the norm in India, comprising at least 90 percent

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Last chance! Casper’s massive mattress sale will save your aching back

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Casper has the mattress of your dreams, and it’s on sale for the 4th of July. (Photo: Casper)
Casper has the mattress of your dreams, and it’s on sale for the 4th of July. (Photo: Casper)

How’s your back? If you’re like most of us, these last few months of less activity (and more staying in) have meant noticeable aches and pains. Add to that the stress of sleeping on an old mattress and you might find your back in a constant state of discomfort.

While core exercises are never a bad idea, no amount of Zoom fitness will fix your back if your bed is the root of the problem. Of course now is not the time to visit mattress stores and plop down Goldilocks-style in search of a match. But it IS

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How to Watch 2021 Ford Bronco’s Debut on Monday, July 13

From Car and Driver

  • Ford will reveal its 2021 Bronco lineup to the world using what marketers call a “roadblock” across Disney television channels ABC, ESPN, and National Geographic.
  • Unfortunate nomenclature aside, the reveal starts at 8 p.m. ET on Monday, July 13, and will also be available to stream on Ford’s YouTube page and Ford’s social media accounts.
  • The reason for all the hype? Ford will start taking $100 reservations for the new Bronco models right when the cameras start rolling at 8 p.m.

You may have noticed that Ford is about to bring back the Bronco. Nostalgia for this brand hits some people pretty hard, and Ford is tweaking all the knobs it can—including basically taking over Disney’s media channels for a few minutes—to get people even more amped up. It’s all happening Monday evening, and if you want to join the party to be the first to

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Virus spread, not politics should guide schools, doctors say

As the Trump administration pushes full steam ahead to force schools to resume in-person education, public health experts warn that a one-size-fits-all reopening could drive infection and death rates even higher.

They’re urging a more cautious approach, which many local governments and school districts are already pursuing.

There are too many uncertainties and variables, they say, for back-to-school to be back-to-normal.

Where is the virus spreading rapidly? Do students live with aged grandparents? Do teachers have high-risk health conditions that would make online teaching safest? Do infected children easily spread COVID-19 to each other and to adults?

Regarding the latter, some evidence suggests they don’t, but a big government study aims to find better proof. Results won’t be available before the fall, and some schools are slated to reopen in just a few weeks.

“These are complicated issues. You can’t just charge straight ahead,” Dr. Tom Frieden, former director of

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A 19-year-old aspiring astronaut is the only person who’s attended every NASA space camp. She’s already positioning herself for a mission to Mars.

Alyssa Carson is an aspiring astronaut.
Alyssa Carson is an aspiring astronaut.

Bert Carson

  • Alyssa Carson is part of a group of young people working to position themselves to be the first astronauts to go to Mars.

  • Carson, who is now 19, has attended every NASA space camp and was the youngest person to graduate from the Advanced Space Academy.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Alyssa Carson attended her first space camp at 5 years old. She graduated from the Advanced Space Academy program at 16, the youngest person ever to do so. Before the pandemic hit, the rising college sophomore had planned to spend her summer flying airplanes. 

The eventual goal: fly to Mars. 

Carson is one of a small group of young people who are already positioning themselves to be astronauts in the US’s next phase of space exploration. They are attending advanced preparation programs and building social media personas to put

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The Greatest Teaching Techniques Don’t Compute Over Zoom

(Bloomberg Opinion) — I rise to defend the classroom: that traditional venue where the students sit, the teacher declaims and the educational technology has hardly advanced in centuries. This old-fashioned arrangement has been abandoned in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. Instead, all of us, learners and teachers, have been reduced to tiles on a screen, competing for attention with all the distracting detritus of the digital age.

Let me be clear: I deny neither the dangers of the pandemic nor the utility of the virtual classroom in this moment. Nevertheless, it’s important to acknowledge what online learning misses. Here, then, on the basis of nearly four decades of experience, is what we might call “The Case for the Classroom”:

First: Physical presence allows the instructor to read the room. A good teacher does more than stand up and lecture and answer the occasional question. The delivery of the material

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Keep it simple, Democrats. Job One is making sure Americans can cast votes this fall.

Democrats and many others are determined to defeat a toxic president and win governing power to beat back the pandemic, root out institutional racism, and build a robust, equitable economic recovery. Four months out, this all looks possible. Most Americans have never liked Donald Trump or the Republican agenda, and even fewer approve after their bungling efforts to limit damage from the pandemic. But mid-summer polls are not votes.

Nothing matters more right now for presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden’s campaign and its party and civic allies than taking specific steps to make sure that disillusioned Americans can actually vote this fall. Unfortunately, there are worrying signs of premature triumphalism. Too many liberals and progressives are debating policy details or diverting into battles about statues and implausible slogans. Even those concerned with ballot access are investing too much in lawsuits, long after conservative Supreme Court Justices (ruling from home) have

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How Ocado went from understated British grocer to a $18.4 billion tech giant, as the coronavirus pandemic confirms the future of grocery shopping is online

"Bots" are seen on the grid (or "The Hive") of Ocado's "smart platform" in Andover, Britain, on May 1, 2018.
“Bots” are seen on the grid (or “The Hive”) of Ocado’s “smart platform” in Andover, Britain, on May 1, 2018.

REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

  • As grocery stores worldwide experienced stockpiling, long lines, and health worries amid the coronavirus pandemic, millions of people turned to shopping online.

  • It has been a goldrush for the British company Ocado, an online-only grocery marketplace that also operates technology for supermarket giants worldwide.

  • Ocado was the best performing stock on the FTSE 100 in the second quarter of 2020, and, in May, Ocado raised over $1 billion to grow its services.

  • It is now betting big on its US expansion, hoping to convert Americans to grocery shopping online.

  • Huge challenges remain, though. Many Americans are still reluctant to buy food they can’t see in person, and some fear the current online pandemic-driven boom could prove a one-off.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The coronavirus pandemic

Read More

Nothing gives champagne its fizz like a humble radish

Paris (AFP) – Forget Beluga caviar, foie gras, smoked salmon or ortolan, the tiny bird that French gourmets put a napkin over their heads to eat so they can savour every last second of their unique aroma.

No, the food that goes best with the finest champagne is the humble radish.

The discovery was made by the celebrated French chemist and wine expert Jacques Puisais, now 93, who has spent the last half century unsparingly researching which food goes best with different wines.

Didier Depond, the head of the venerable Delamotte champagne house, is so convinced of the validity of Puisais’ science he has become an evangelist for the root vegetable.

But that is not all.

“I grow my own radishes in my garden so I can eat them when I am drinking my champagne,” he told AFP.

“They have all the virtues. They cost nothing and they don’t make

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