How COVID-19 Made Acting Lessons Accessible to Me

Young woman wearing headphones taking online class.
Young woman wearing headphones taking online class.

As an actress with cerebral palsy, I have two needs: Acting lessons for training and transportation to take me there. I have recently moved to Frederick, MD. Back when I lived in Burtonsville, I was much closer to Washington, D.C., the place to study acting in this heart of America. But it doesn’t mean Uber trips were cheap. I began my training at The Theatre Lab last summer. My “Intro to Acting” class was an early Saturday morning class. I could take an $18 Uber ride to Silver Spring and take an easy Metro ride there. Rinse and repeat for the ride home. One of the various reasons was why I took a morning class is because Uber rides are much cheaper in the morning than the evening.

As most acting studios go, most of The Theatre Lab’s classes take place at night

Read More

Pointe at the kitchen counter and more: Ballet amid coronavirus

Ballet training begins at the barre, but in the age of the coronavirus pandemic, a kitchen counter and the back of a couch has become a substitute for even America’s most elite ballerinas. When the pandemic began shutting down the country, entire seasons were put on hold. But while the show can’t go on, the training continues.  “Our bodies are… very much the instrument that we use to express our art and so, a ballet dancer’s body is very highly honed through hours and hours of training,” said Virginia Johnson, artistic director of Dance Theatre of Harlem. In March, the ballet company was in Detroit to premiere a new repertoire when performances were canceled. Johnson called it “devastating.”

Dance Theatre of Harlem might no longer be in a studio 8 hours a day, but they’re holding company classes and rehearsals online from home including ballet class, pointe for women,

Read More

Colleges race to create ‘a new sense of normalcy.’ Will new rules, COVID-19 testing be enough?

SAN DIEGO – When students arrive at the University of California-San Diego in August, they will find coronavirus testing stations strategically planted throughout campus.

To determine whether they’ve been infected, they’ll take a swab, dab it with nasal slime and leave the sample in a collection box. Bar codes with the packets will be linked to their personal medical records and cellphone numbers.

Within a day, students can expect results via text message. For those who test positive, a huge response system includes medical care, isolation and contact tracing.

Robert Schooley, chief of the infectious diseases division at UC San Diego Health, said the reopening plan, dubbed Return to Learn, has multiple scenarios for campus life, and surveillance results will dictate which one administrators deploy. Researchers will even pull manhole covers to check campus sewage for coronavirus levels.

“We want to be able to adjust what we do to what

Read More

HBO’s ‘I’ll Be Gone in the Dark’ Explores the Horrifying Crimes of Golden State Killer Joseph DeAngelo

Photo credit: Justin Sullivan - Getty Images
Photo credit: Justin Sullivan – Getty Images

From Esquire

Photo credit: Justin Sullivan - Getty Images
Photo credit: Justin Sullivan – Getty Images

On June 29th, 74-year-old Joseph DeAngelo plead guilty to a string of kidnappings and murders, confessing to be the serial rapist and murderer who terrorized California during the 1970s and ‘80s. For decades, families, survivors, and investigators puzzled over the dozens of crimes he committed, and now the story and late writer Michelle McNamara‘s efforts to bring attention to and solve the case are the subject of the six-part HBO series, I’ll Be Gone in the Dark. Here’s what’s known so far about DeAngelo’s life, and how, with the help of online genealogical catalogues, he was finally brought to justice.

Joseph DeAngelo was born into a military family in 1945.

Joseph James DeAngelo was born in Bath, New York, and he spent part of his childhood in West Germany, where his father

Read More

Trump Trolled for Fourth of July Event Performer as Internet Recalls Obama’s Star Power

President Donald Trump is being trolled on Twitter after footage of a man singing a Bruno Mars song at his Fourth of July event at the White House was shared online.

Many of the president’s critics were quick to point out that former President Barack Obama had the real Bruno Mars perform at his Fourth of July party in 2015, calling it “a tale of two presidents.”

“Perfect anology [sic] for the deterioration at the White House: 5 years ago the real Bruno Mars performed at the White House,” one user wrote on Twitter while retweeting the video of Trump’s celebration. 

RELATED: Trump Claims ‘Left-Wing Cultural Revolution’ Wants to ‘End America’ in Divisive Mt. Rushmore Speech

?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1279587798820020225%7Ctwgr%5E&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fetcanada.com%2Fnews%2F664408%2Fwhite-guy-sings-bruno-mars-at-trumps-salute-to-america-twitter-reminds-that-obamas-2015-july-4th-event-featured-the-actual-bruno-mars%2F

In the footage, the

Read More

Last chance! Wake up feeling refreshed (not achy) with Casper’s 4th of July mattress sale

Yahoo Life is committed to finding you the best products at the best prices. We may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Pricing and availability are subject to change.

Casper has the mattress of your dreams, and it’s on sale for the 4th of July. (Photo: Casper)
Casper has the mattress of your dreams, and it’s on sale for the 4th of July. (Photo: Casper)

How’s your back? If you’re like most of us, these last few months of less activity (and more staying in) have meant noticeable aches and pains. Add to that the stress of sleeping on an old mattress and you might find your back in a constant state of discomfort.

While core exercises are never a bad idea, no amount of Zoom fitness will fix your back if your bed is the root of the problem. Of course now is not the time to visit mattress stores and plop down Goldilocks-style in search of a match. But it IS

Read More

Keeping COVID-19 outside of camps is a near impossible challenge

As summer camps across the country debated whether and how to operate during the coronavirus pandemic this spring, Kanakuk Kamps, a prominent network of Christian sports camps in Missouri, announced its five overnight camps would open to over 20,000 kids starting May 30.

“Our full-time summer staff of 1,600 qualified individuals including 100 registered nurses and 60 volunteer doctors are hired and sitting on ready,” Joe White, who runs the camp with his wife Debbie-Jo, told families. “We are planning on being open all summer.”

On their website the camp assured parents “We are focused on taking all reasonable measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in our Kamps.”

But now even cautious hopes that COVID-19 might be kept outside Kanakuk Kamps’ gates are already dashed. On July 1, parents were notified by email that one of the camps, known as K-2, was shutting down. The Stone County Health Department’

Read More

Concerned on Parts of Tech Sector, But Sees Continued Growth Tied to Two Megatrends: Fidelity

The recent recovery in stock markets has been at odds with economists maintaining a gloomier global economic outlook. The rally is largely driven by the optimism of economic recovery and a much stronger recovery in the technology sector.

The S&P 500 information technology sector has returned about 10% in 2020, including reinvested dividends. Although during the tech bubble of 1990s the sector has never booked over 14% of the S&P 500’s earnings, its profit contribution surged to more than 20% of S&P 500 net income in recent years.

It is likely that technology will play a significant role across different countries and cultures in future, generating better returns in the long run for these tech companies.

“I remain concerned about the impact of recession on parts of the tech sector, but I see continued growth driven by 2 megatrends: the shift to digital experiences and the shift to cloud computing,”

Read More

Would You Pay $7,500 to Educate Your Kid Like Elon Musk’s?

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast / Photos Getty
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast / Photos Getty

The novel coronavirus has shattered education in America, leaving millions of parents struggling to cope with childcare and remote classes. Naturally, tech billionaires have taken it upon themselves to fill the void.

But while Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg pledged $6 million to education projects, and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey gave $10 million to provide devices and connectivity to students in California, Elon Musk is helping launch an online school targeted at the relatively wealthy.

The online Astra Nova School, which is slated to open its virtual doors in September, would succeed an ultra-exclusive school that operated out of Musk’s SpaceX rocket factory until recently and had many of the same staff. It’s a model experts on the intersection of education and inequality said was not exactly in keeping with the most urgent needs of this pandemic moment.

Starting in 2016, Ad Astra

Read More

Colleges are racing to create ‘a new sense of normalcy.’ Will new rules, COVID-19 testing be enough?

SAN DIEGO — When students arrive at the University of California San Diego in August, they will find coronavirus testing stations strategically planted throughout campus.

To determine if they’ve been infected, they’ll take a swab, dab it with nasal slime and leave the sample in a collection box. Bar codes with the packets will be linked to their personal medical records and cell phone numbers.

Within a day, students can expect results via text message. For those who test positive, it will set in motion a huge response system that includes medical care, isolation and contact tracing.

Robert Schooley, chief of the infectious diseases division at UC San Diego Health, said the reopening plan, dubbed Return to Learn, has multiple scenarios for campus life and surveillance results will dictate which one administrators deploy. Researchers will even pull manhole covers to check campus sewage for coronavirus levels.

“We want to be

Read More